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Here Are the Laws in California for Time Off During the Holidays

Thanksgiving will be here before we know it and it is important that we get the time we need with our family. This would be a great time to look over what your boss is obligated to as far as being accommodating to requests for vacation time during the holiday season. You should also look at the pay responsibilities if you do end up working on a holiday. Here are some things to think about when looking forward into the holidays.

1. Business owners in California are not mandated to let their employees get vacation time during the holiday season. There are no laws that state that employers need to provide time off. When employees go to work on Saturdays, Sundays, and the holiday season, they should be treated the same as regular business hours. Business owners don’t need to provide paid holidays and their business is able to close out on any holiday. 

2. Employers in California are not required by law to pay their employees vacation time on a holiday. They are also not mandated to pay additional money to employees who labor on a holiday. Business owners are also not required to pay their workers additional or holiday money for their labor that is worked on a holiday. It is the employer’s choice to pay their employees the extra money for the labor that is needed on a holiday. It needs to be in the company policy for this to take effect.

3. Business owners need to accommodate their employees who are not able to perform labor on specific holidays because of their religion. Business owners should be accommodating to their workers in regards to religion. The evaluation of this usually comes in a case by case basis and is based on the type of company and the request made by the worker. If the business owner’s way of doing things needs workers to be at work during a holiday, such as a movie theater, this needs to be written in the employee handbook. 

Click here to learn everything you need to know about disrimination in the workplace!

4. When the business owner pays for time off on a holiday, they don’t need to allow his or her employees to collect time off for the holiday. When or if the worker quits his or her job prior to the holidays, the business owner does not need to pay him or her for the time taken off. The business owner’s rules in regards to compensation needs to be stated in the handbook that the holiday pay benefit doesn’t become collected and that they need to be still employed with the business to receive it.

Do you have a question about holiday pay? Click here to contact Von Esch Law today!

Courtesy of Cuselleration

Everything You Need to Know About Racial Discrimination in the Workplace

Did you know that it’s illegal in the state of California for an employer to have discrimination toward an individual because of their ethnic background? People that are harassed or discriminated against an employee based on race could make a claim in opposition to his or her boss for the damages done.

1. Could a California employer decline to bring on an individual because of his or her ethnicity?

No, a business owner in California can’t decline to bring on an individual due to his or her ethnic background. Employment discrimination because of an individual’s race is a It is illegal in the state of California to discriminate in workplace because of an individual’s ethnicity.

It is not legal for a the business owner with five or more workers to single out a person based on ethnicity as seen under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act .

2. How can you discriminate against ethnic background?

Race discrimination usually occurs when you behave towards a person in a different manner than other due to the place she or she was born in, how he or she looks, or their race. Color, race and ethnicity could mean various things to different people. There is oftentimes a ton of overlap. But it is illegal in California to discriminate based on color, race or ethnicity.

Racial discrimination could also be incorporated with national origin discrimination. This happens when the employer treats a worker or job candidate badly because he or she comes from a certain nation or comes off as a certain ethnicity.

Ethnic background can be linked to cultural aspects based on where he or she grew up or where his or her relatives came from. This is the same as the definition of national origin under California law. National origin refers to a person’s place of birth or original heritage. The laws against race discrimination are not only limited to employers. These laws also apply to labor organizations and unions. These are prohibited from expelling, excluding or restricting membership to an individual based on color or race.

Assumed Ethnic Background

Race discrimination in the workplace is not legal even if the individual has made an error about the victim’s ethnicity. The California workplace laws against race discrimination based also applies to the ethnic background that is assumed. If the business owner happens to have made an error about the applicant’s race or color, it’s not a defense to discrimination against race.

An instance would be if an manager conducting an interview might choose not to hire the candidate due to not trusting Chinese people. The candidate was really a United States citizen, grew up in America to parents from South Korea.

If the applicant files a complaint against the employer for race discrimination, the fact that the employer has made an error about the applicant’s race is not a defense. The employer might still be in violation of workplace discrimination laws for any discrimination based on race.

Click here to learn why you need a lawyer to review your contract!

3. Can you be discriminated against by someone from the same race?

An employer could discriminate against someone from the same race. California’s employment discrimination laws are not based on the employer’s race but make any race discrimination not lawful.

Do you have a question about race discrimination in the workplace? Click here to contact Von Esch Law today!

Courtesy of Cuselleration

 

Your Guide to Sexual Harassment Laws in California

If you have been harassed sexually while you are work, you’re most likely not alone in this. According to one current of the EEOC studies, twenty five percent of women and twenty percent of men have been sexually harassed on the job.  

One only has to watch the news channels or do a search of the “me too” hashtag to discover a large number experiences of disturbing behavior, much of which have lead to sexual harassment inside the workplace.

Quid Pro Quo Harassing

This is a Latin originated term that means this for this or this for that. The term means the idea of exchanging something. In this case, quid pro quo harassment happens when a colleague conditions your continued employment, hiring, benefits or position promotion on submitting to desired sexual acts or some other kind of sexual advance. This type of harassing can be meant as threatening. Quid pro quo sexual harassment is seen as extreme enough that just one occurrence make the company liable.

Hostility While at Work

This type of sexual harassment happens when the sexual harassment act is so prevalent or extreme that it interrupts your work flow, changes the condition of your workplace or frequently offends you. It is possible to experience hostility even if the act isn’t even directed towards you.

Just one act of harassing someone sexually might be severe enough to be illegal. The acts that are less extreme might also become so pervasive that it becomes unlawful, even if the single incident on its own wasn’t particularly offensive or hostile. The legal test of whether or not something qualifies as a hostile work environment sexual harassment includes both objective and subjective components.

Who will be liable for sexual harassment claims in California?

Under the California law, an employee who is the perpetrator of the sexual harassment is personally liable for damages to their victim regardless of whether or not the employer was aware or should have known about the harassment.

Employers are held strictly liable if the sexual harassment was at the hands of a supervisor or if the perpetrator of the harassment was the employer. This means that if the harassment was perpetrated by the supervisor, the employer is responsible for the victim’s damage whether or not the employer was aware or should have known about it and regardless of whether or not they took corrective action.

Click here to learn how to protect yourself from business fraud!

While some interpretations of California sexual harassment can evoke some uncomfortable laughs, sexual harassment is very far from a laughing matter and could cause serious trauma for its victims. This also does not stop harassers from claiming the offending behavior was just a mere joke. In few cases cases, it might actually be the perpetrator’s misguided intention to be funny.  But it is not just the harasser’s intent that matters. It’s how an objective person would react and the impact of that behavior that results in whether or not the behavior constitutes sexual harassment. 

Do you have a question about sexual harassment laws in California? Click here to contact Von Esch Law today!

Courtesy of Cuselleration

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Disability Discrimination in the Workplace

It is not an uncommon occurrence to find that the disabled in the society end up being discriminated in the workplace. But then again, it also isn’t a good practice to discriminate or undermine anyone who is disabled anywhere. Fortunately, California state laws offer protection for the disabled from any kind of discrimination at work.

Most of these state laws also prohibit an employer from subjecting any of their disabled employees to any kind of unequal treatment in regards to your actual or perceived disabilities. So, how will you know whether you are being subjected to any form of discrimination at work due to your disability?

Read below to find out.

What is disability discrimination?

If you are disabled in any way and working, then you can spot any kind of disability discrimination either from your employer or fellow employees quite easily. This unlawful habit may even start right from the moment you are applying for a new job. The moment you realize that you are being

treated unfavorably by your interviewer or employer qualifies as a disability discrimination. California also has laws that expect employers to provide reasonable accommodation to their disabled employees and/or applicants.

Definition of disability

A disability is a state of any medical condition which impairs activity. This can also include an employee’s ability to work optimally in the workplace. Disabilities can always take many different forms. Most disabilities are usually physical impairments. But you will also find situations where psychiatric conditions can hinder an employee or applicant from performing at work.

As a disabled applicant or employee, you also need to know that not all disabilities are protected by law. So, for you to be protected, you first need to qualify for a job, then see whether your California laws protect employees of applicants with your kind of disability.

Signs of disability discrimination in the workplace

Aside from the clear fact that California has put federal laws in place to protect the disabled from any kind of discrimination at work, disability discrimination occurrences still happen. The moment you realize that your employee is subjecting you to less favorable working environments due to your medical condition, you will know that you are being discriminated against. These forms of discrimination may include reduced working hours, denial of a raise and/or promotions, or even write-ups.

Common disability discrimination signs at work

  • Being threatened or even harassed due to your disability
  • An employer, not hiring you due to your disability
  • Being publicly shamed due to your disability
  • Verbal abuse by an employer due to your disability
  • Being cyber-bullied either by your employer or co-workers due to your disability
  • Being demoted as a result of your disability
  • Denial of promotions due to your disability
  • Being left out of staff meetings due to your disability
  • Contract termination as a result of your disability.

Do you have a question disability discrimination in the workplace? Click here to contact Von Esch Law today!

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Workplace Harassment Laws in California

Have you experienced harassment and bullying in a workplace in California? If your answer is yes, this behavior could be disregarding the California Labor Law. California was among the first states in the nation that introduced the anti-bullying legislation in the year 2003 and the Healthy Workplace Bill. It is sad that there is currently still an occurrence of workplace bullying in California.

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