6 Reasons a Parent May Lose Custody of a Child

There are a number of reasons a parent might lose custody of a child. Some might be pretty obvious, while others may be a bit more surprising. In general, a parent will lose custody of a child in cases of abuse, neglect, or other findings related to domestic violence.

Here are six different reasons a parent might lose custody of a child.

Abuse: One of the most common reasons a parent loses custody is due to abuse. There are a variety of types of abuse. One is physical, which can lead to burns, wounds, and scars. Often, abusers will use their hands or other objects to cause injury to a child.

No matter the jurisdiction, the law is very clear. Abuse that is reported to the proper authorities is a legitimate reason for a parent to lose custody. Oftentimes, parents who have been convicted of child abuse can lose both physical and legal custody of children and might have their parenting time severely limited, or even cut off entirely.

Click here to learn facts about child custody agreements!

Abduction: Those who choose to abduct a child can also lose custody depending on the case and where the crime took place. Some parents who choose to abduct their children can lose legal or physical custody of them depending on the circumstances.

False Allegations: Even though abuse is a well-known way to lose custody of a child, false allegations of abuse can also lead to a loss of custody. A parent that knowingly lies about allegations of physical or sexual abuse can lose custody, depending on how serious the allegations are.

This is a serious issue because the law is very clear on punishing people who try to interfere with the other parent’s lawful contact with their children by making allegations of abuse. Courts have no problem taking custody away from a parent that makes false allegations to protect the health and safety of the children involved.

Neglect: Neglect is another reason a parent might lose custody. This type of abuse centralizes around a failure to act where a child might not be getting the food and care he or she needs. Parents can lose custody by neglecting their children if a court finds the child was endangered in any way, especially if the neglect is ongoing. However, neglect can be hard to prove since it can be difficult to pick up on unless someone regularly sees the children.

Domestic Violence: Domestic violence can lead to a parent losing custody of a child if the court finds it appropriate. This topic is pertinent because it usually comes up in a family law case where questions about abuse and neglect of a child are already present.

Violation Of Custody Orders: Violating orders related to the custody of children can also be a way to lose further custody, depending on the actual mechanics of the case. Violations of these types of orders can be very mundane, like being late for an exchange, to something more willful, like making a decision without talking to the other partner.

Do you have a question about child custody in California? Click here to contact Von Esch Law today!

Courtesy of Cuselleration

Facts About the Right to Repair Act

You probably hear a lot about ‘damages’ when it comes to attorneys and litigation. But what do damages really mean? There are two types of damages, actual and economic. Actual damages encompass physical injuries and property damage, while economic damages centralize around the cost of a repair that did not encompass a physical injury or lead to property damage.

A good example to think about both has to do with construction. Actual damages would consist of things like a bad roof that leads to water damage, or even a collapse that injures someone inside of the building. Economic damages would have to do with the actual cost of repairing or replacing the bad roof, aside form any other property damage or injury claims.

Background

In 1998, the California Supreme Court said economic damages from construction defects are not able to be recovered in instances of negligence or strict liability. They made this ruling in Aas vs. Superior Court.

In response, the Right to Repair Act came into effect. The Act says homeowners in newly constructed housing can sue for economic damages if the residence did not meet certain construction standards.

The Act came into existence thanks to the work of legislators in California through SB 800. The intention of SB 800 was to mitigate the effects of the Aas decision.

Here’s a few facts about the Right to Repair Act to keep in mind.

It applies to all claims relating to construction defects

Homeowners also have the ability to file a claims related to personal injury, breach of contract, strict liability, and fraud, without having to adhere to the pre litigation stipulations spelled out in the Act.

It now covers more than just economic loss

A California Supreme Court Case in 2018 said the Act can now cover cases relating to property damage that arise out of defects related to construction.

Click here to learn about financial fraud laws in California!

It is now the exclusive way to recover property damages that are related to construction defects

However, personal injury damages are still outside the scope of the Act and are not listed as a recoverable category.

Homeowners must still comply with the pre litigation procedures spelled out in the Act even if their construction defect is not specifically listed in the Act

The California Supreme Court, when taking on this question, said homeowners are not able to bypass the pre litigation procedures because the Act has a ‘catchall standard’ in addition to the specific construction standards that were listed.

The decision by the California Supreme Court was seen as a big win for builders, contractors, manufactures, and design professionals

This was because of a couple of reasons. First, the vast majority of claims still had to go through the pre litigation procedures as spelled out in the Act. It also substantiated that the Act still applied to construction defects that were not specifically laid out in the jargon and wording of the Act itself.

The Right to Repair Act might seem like a complicated piece of legislation. There’s an extensive amount of background that corresponds with how it’s interpreted and seen today. Overall, homeowners do reserve the right to bring claims, but usually still have to go through a pre litigation process, except in certain instances.

Do you have a question about the Right to Repair Act? Click here to contact Von Esch Law today!

Courtesy of Cuselleration